Friday Night Post #3

I’ve had a hard time staying on track this past week. I’ve been a day behind in life as well as on the blog, so this weekend will be about catching up.

I’m working on improving the “Resources page.  I’m asking you all for resources relating to faith, self-care, trans* existences, and POC existences.  What do you read? What are your go-to educational resources?  Have you read/seen/listened to anything lately that’s changed your life?  I’d love to know about it.  Leave a comment on this post or message me through the contact page.

I’m still in the process of trying to find a new name and a new look.  I’ve narrowed down a couple different themes, but the name will really help to determine which one I pick.  If you have any suggestions, let me know.

Thanks for reading ya’ll!

❤ Taj

 

Found In Philly

As the bus pulled into Philadelphia, I started to feel anxious.  I hadn’t really thought about my expectations of the Philadelphia Trans Health Conference, and at that moment, the thought of what I would be walking to was overwhelming.  I’ve never had the opportunity to spend time with more than 10 trans* people at a time.  I couldn’t even conceptualize what it would be like to spend a few days with over 50 let alone thousands.  So I panicked.  The bus slowed, I gathered my suitcase and messenger bag, and set out for my hotel with shaky, sweaty hands.

Continue reading “Found In Philly”

A Letter to a Queen

9/22/13

Dear Cassidy,

When I read the news that you had been crowned homecoming queen, I thought, “things are changing for the better.” This would have never happened at my high school, but I am about 10 years older than you are, and didn’t have the courage to transition in high school.  When I watched this video, I couldn’t help but to feel like I needed to say something.  My words may not mean much to you.  I am not 16 and trans.  I am not a MTF, and I’m well aware of the fact that MTFs often walk a harder path than FTMs.  That said, your story is part of my story in this grand gender narrative, and I feel like I would be doing an injustice to you by not reaching out.

Yes, it is hard, and the world can be a mean and cruel place.  The internet is even crueler.   People in the internet have anonymity that they don’t have in the real world, so they say cruel things without having to take the responsibility for what they have done.  That said, I am 10 years older than you, and have seen the world shift so dramatically in that short time towards more acceptance of trans folks. The people who went down this road before me (and you) paved the way for us to be who we are publicly.

The fact is that you ARE a queen and it seems like the folks at your school love you enough to see that.  You’re a brave, tender soul who, though strong, needs support.  You need to be held up sometimes, and that’s OK.  You have support, not just from the folks at your school, but from so many people who admire your courage.  Right now, it may seem like you’re only hearing from the idiots who are shouting loudly, but I’ve seen your story across the internet and I can tell you that it’s effecting a lot of people in good ways.

There are hard days.  There are days where none of it seems worth it.  There are days where getting out of bed is the hardest thing to do.  But there are days where the sun shines on all of the beautiful things, and you face the world with a lion’s courage. In 10 years, maybe it won’t be as big of a deal when a trans kid wins homecoming queen or king because you will have helped to change the world into a place where that doesn’t matter.

By all means, cry.  Feel your feelings.  When you’re done, go back to being the fierce girl that you are.  Don’t let the idiots win!  You have so much to give.

Solidarity and Grace,

Taj